© 2009  feebee. 

もっと見る

"Three wise monkeys" 2016

Sumi ink, gold leaf, Pigment paint on wood panel  /  910×727mm  x3

In creating this piece, I visited Nikko Tosho-gu to document the Three Wise Monkeys famous for portraying the proverb “See no evil, speak no evil, hear no evil.” I had visited Nikko 25 years ago when I was a student, but this was the first time I went there since becoming an artist. Though I remembered previously seeing the Three Wise Monkeys, I could not recall what was around it. As it turns out, there are a total of sixteen monkeys, including the famous three, depicted in eight carvings: five on the northern exterior wall of the stable for the sacred horse and three on the western exterior wall. The eight carvings represent stages in life from child-rearing to falling in love, marriage, and pregnancy. The three monkeys in the second carving depict the teaching not to let children see, speak, or hear evil in order for them to grow up with honest hearts. The eight carvings can be viewed in a sequential loop, with the final carving depicting a pregnant monkey leading back to the first carving depicting a baby monkey.

From its wordplay in Japanese, I had assumed that the three wise monkeys originated in Japan, but after having done some research, I discovered that similar visual representations and proverbs were also found in ancient Egypt and at Angkor Wat. Today the three wise monkeys are used in many contexts across the world from Sunday school lessons to textbooks to Hollywood films. I believe this widespread use is due to the universal message pertinent to our lives contained in the image.

People develop their personalities through their experiences. In childhood we are influenced by what we see and hear, and in turn as adults, we influence children through how we act and talk. As the monkey in the eighth carving leads back to the one in the first, so too does the world move in cycles.

In recent years, the proliferation of the Internet has resulted in more opportunities for children and us to see and hear many things. Having seen the Three Wise Monkeys at Nikko, I felt that we needed the monkeys now more than ever.

 

 

《三猿》 2016

墨、金箔、顔料、木製パネル  /  910×727mm  x3

私は本作品を制作するにあたり、「見ざる、言わざる、聞かざる」のことわざで有名な「三猿」を取材するため日光東照宮を訪れました。かつて学生時代に訪れたことがありましたが、画家としての活動を始めてからは初めてで、実に25年ぶりの訪問となりました。

先に述べたように、この三猿は以前にも見た事があったのですが、私は有名な「三猿」の彫刻のみを記憶していて、その周りに関しては正直記憶が曖昧でした。実際は、神馬をつなぐ厩の外壁北側に5枚、西側に3枚の計8枚の彫刻があり、三猿を含む16匹の猿が存在していました。

説明によると、この8枚の彫刻は子育てから恋愛、結婚、妊娠と「人間の一生」を風刺しているとの事で、2枚目の三猿は「物心のつく幼少期には、悪いことを見たり、言ったり、聞いたりせず、素直な心のまま成長せよ」という教えを暗示しているものでした。そして、この彫刻は8枚目で子を身ごもった猿が、1枚目に戻り赤ん坊から再度繰り返し鑑賞出来る作りになっていました。

 

三猿は、その日本語の語呂合わせから日本が三猿発祥の地と思っていましたが、調べて見ると三猿ポーズの図案や「見ざる、言わざる、聞かざる」に似た表現は、古くは古代エジプトやアンコールワットにも見られるそうです。

現代では、教会の日曜学校などで三猿を用いて諭したり、インドの教科書に掲載されている「ガンジーの三猿」や、更に身近なものだとハリウッド映画のワンシーンで引用されたりと、世界中の様々な場面で三猿が使われているのですが、これは三猿の普遍的なメッセージが、人生の教訓として私たちの生活のに取り入れやすいからではないかと思いました。

 

人は様々な体験を通し、見たり聞いたりする事で人格形成の基盤を作っていきます。幼少期に見聞きする事で受ける影響、そして大人になり子供に諭す時に、その子供が見聞きする事。8枚目の猿が1枚目の猿に繫がるように、世界は循環していきます。

 

近年はインターネットの普及により、幼少期に様々な情報を見聞きする機会が多くなりました。

私は日光東照宮で「三猿」を見て、今こそ「三猿」が必要な時代だと確信しました。